Education Reform Is More than May 1

Teacher salaries stink. In the south, they stink worse than just about anywhere else.

Depending on which statistical analysis you read, five of the 10 worst states at paying teachers are in the south. And it is virtually impossible to find any list where a southern state makes the 10 best in paying their teachers.

Many voters in our communities are aware of this, believe this, and even support changing this. They talk about how terrible it is that teachers get paid peanuts to educate our children, while someone gets millions of dollars to throw or catch or hit a ball.

It’s just over a month since a group of 10,000 teachers marched on the state house in South Carolina, seeking that level of respect that they richly deserve. Unfortunately, the person who should fight with them and for them let the moment of truth pass by completely disrespecting those that she partially represents.

Molly Spearman seems like a competent educator and provides some solid work for the students and teachers of this state. But her dismissive rhetoric towards this teacher’s March on Columbia demonstrates that our government leaders, even now, just do not “get it.”

Spearman made quite a production by flaunting her willingness to substitute in classrooms while teachers marched in Columbia. In so doing, she pulled out jargon that is typical of a second-grade teacher reprimanding a student for chewing gum.

“…I cannot support teachers walking out on their obligations to South Carolina students, families, and the thousands of hardworking bus drivers, cafeteria workers, counselors, aides, and custodial staff whose livelihoods depend on our schools being operational” (Superintendent of Education Molly Spearman, April 29).

Side note:  I wonder if Superintendent Spearman is this concerned about bus drivers, cafeteria workers, counselors, aides, and custodial staff at budget time, when she needs to be fighting to have more of them and to pay them a living wage?

This is a stunning example of a missed opportunity—again—by educational and government leaders in this state. Mrs. Spearman’s comments come across as condescending and tone-deaf. At best, they show us how our “leaders” in Columbia just don’t get it.

Here’s the proof:  Where was Mrs. Spearman on the Thursday following the march, when school districts across the state ran short on substitutes for teachers who were sick or had family emergencies? Did she make herself available to drive or ride a bus because there is a shortage of bus drivers? Did she offer herself as a teaching assistant, or give teachers a bathroom break, or grade papers, or fill out those forms that teachers all love?

This grandstanding and showboating in opposition to the people who serve in these conditions, day in and day out, is exactly why we continue to fail both our students and our educators in the state of South Carolina. And it’s time to stop.

I still remember Governor Richard Riley’s “penny sales tax” initiative in 1984. This would solve our funding issues for South Carolina schools, improve our test scores, and “raise the bar” for public education in the state. It probably helped; but, like most single-answer solutions, it was a temporary fix for a long-term problem.

Year after year, the status quo remains. And year after year, people continue to miss the greater point that teachers want you to understand. This is not just about money. It is also about RESOURCES and RESPECT. While efforts such as Governor Riley’s initiative address part of the issue, we cannot expect to do one thing to fix such a complex problem.

For decades, teachers asked nicely for this to be fixed. The time has come for them to act, and we should reward their patience rather than critiquing it. The only people who have ignored their obligations are the people who should have fixed this decades ago, and that includes Mrs. Spearman.

State legislators declared this the “Year of Education” in South Carolina. They then went about proposing legislation that included limited or after-the-fact input from the educators themselves. And when I say educators, I am not referring to the bureaucrats and politicians and administrators who think they understand what’s happening in the classrooms based on some data sheet. I’m talking about the TEACHERS who live and work and carry this burden each and every day.

The student who comes to school with a growling stomach? The one who stays up all night playing video games because they are unsupervised? The other who is homeless and has no place to shower or wash clothes? Teachers own those issues. They bring the issues of their students home with them, and it eats away at their well-being. And these teachers know that they may be the last bridge to a better life for the children and young people of South Carolina.

To propose legislation without talking to them extensively and on every conceivable level is yet another slap in the face to an underpaid, disrespected group of people who are vital to the future of this state.

Keep in mind that public school teachers do not get to choose their students. They do not get to select the “best of the best” or hold a competition or charge a fee to go to their institution. They take everyone, and do all that they can to lead, guide, and direct—without judgment and without recourse.

That is certainly a trait to be respected and admired with an offering of adequate salary, above average resources, and the highest possible level of respect.

Here’s the thing:  We’ve discussed this issue for years with little or no results. What the teachers and their supporters did on May 1 was an outpouring of frustration for decades of inaction on the part of the state and its leadership. They waited longer than almost any other state (such as Kentucky or West Virginia) to spring into action. Why would we belittle that patience and commitment rather than rewarding it?

Mrs. Spearman could accomplish so much more by supporting teachers AND students in this decades-long battle. Perhaps try something along the lines of “I completely support teachers in fighting for what is best for the students and families of South Carolina—including their own. And I am substituting to make sure that teachers can freely attend the march on May 1.”

We’ve known for years and years that teachers deserve more respect, appreciation, resources, and salary. It is high time for administrators and politicians to recognize this reality and get busy doing something about it! And they can start by listening to teachers before inventing ideas.

Let’s be honest: EVERY year has to be the “Year of Education.” We constantly have to upgrade and adjust and prepare for what the future may bring. Doing this means paying teachers what they deserve, and giving them the respect that they earn on a daily basis. This will empower them to be what students need for them to be.

Our teachers and our students deserve that much—and not just for one year, but every year. If those in charge of policy would recognize that, then days such as May 1 might not be necessary.

My encouragement to you is this:  Do not stop writing your legislators. Do not stop protesting. Do not stop raising your voice. It is going to take more than one day to truly get the attention of government and administration. Although we’ve fought for years, we have to keep battling for the well-being of our state and its students.

We have talked long enough. Let us continue to challenge the policy makers to stop grandstanding and start doing.

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